What’s CBD?

What is CBD?


Short for Cannabidiol, CBD is one of over 100 compounds called cannabinoids that are found in cannabis plants. You might be thinking, “Isn’t that where marijuana comes from?” Yes, but unlike the mind-altering compound tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), Cannabidiol is non-psychoactive, meaning it will not get you high. Since Cannabidiol does not cause psychoactive effects, it is an excellent option for people seeking the benefits of cannabis products without the high or breaking federal law.

Learn about the Endocannabinoid system in the body and how it works here.

Topical Use of CBD and Nature’s Mana Products

Topical CBD products have been used to treat:

  • Joint pain (arthritis pain)
  • Joint swelling
  • Muscle pain
  • Inflammatory skin conditions
  • Psoriasis
  • Eczema
  • Itchy Rashes
  • Bacterial infections (MRSA)
  • Neck and back pain
  • Contact dermatitis
  • Acne
  • Nerve pain

The endocannabinoid system is thought to play an important role in the immune response of our skin. An improper immune response can result in inflammation and this is why CBD is being researched as an anti-inflammatory for inflammation related skin conditions. Other important functions of the endocannabinoid system in the skin include regulation of cell growth and wound healing. People with arthritis pain have reported fast relief by applying cannabinoid rich topical products directly to an inflamed and painful joint.

Nature’s Mana only manufactures products for topical use. No products listed in this site should be ingested or used internally.

U.S Government and CBD

The NIH (U.S Govt. National Institute of Health) supports a broad portfolio of research on cannabinoids and the endocannabinoid system. This research portfolio includes some studies utilizing the whole marijuana plant (Cannabis sativa), but most studies focus on individual cannabinoid compounds. Individual cannabinoid chemicals may be isolated and purified from the marijuana plant or synthesized in the laboratory, or they may be naturally occurring (endogenous) cannabinoids found in the body.

There is considerable interest in the possible therapeutic uses of marijuana and its constituent compounds (see NIDA’s DrugFacts, Is Marijuana Medicine?). In 2015, the NIH developed three reporting categories to describe the research efforts underway to examine the chemical, physiological, and therapeutic properties of cannabinoids and the physiological systems they affect.

  1. Cannabinoid Research reports the total NIH investment in all cannabinoid research including basic research, animal and human preclinical studies, and clinical research. Studies examining cannabis use disorder and societal/health impacts due to changing marijuana laws and policies are also included. Studies examine all classes of cannabinoids (purified, synthetic, endogenous, phytocannabinoids), molecules that modify their concentration or activity (e.g. FAAH inhibitors), as well as the physiological systems they target (e.g. endocannabinoid system).
  2. Cannabidiol Research – subset of the Cannabinoid Research category that reports all NIH projects examining basic, preclinical, and therapeutic properties of CBD.
  3. Therapeutic Cannabinoid Research – subset of the Cannabinoid Research category (above) that reports all NIH projects examining the therapeutic properties of allclasses of cannabinoids (purified, synthetic, endogenous, phytocannabinoids).

In fiscal year 2017, the NIH supported 330 projects totaling almost $140 million on cannabinoid research. Within this investment, 70 projects ($36 million) examined therapeutic properties of cannabinoids, and 26 projects ($15 million) focused on CBD. Cannabinoid research is supported broadly across NIH Institutes and Centers (ICs), with each IC supporting research specifically focused on the impact of cannabinoids on health effects within their scientific mission. For the latest on the U.S Government developments with CBD click here.

The 2018 Farm Bill provides important agricultural and nutritional policy extensions for five years, the most interesting changes involve the cannabis plant. Typically, cannabis is not part of the conversation around farm subsidies, nutritional assistance, and crop insurance. Yet, this year, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s strong support of and leadership on the issue of hemp has thrust the cannabis plant into the limelight.

For a little bit of background, hemp is defined in the legislation as the cannabis plant (yes, the same one that produces marijuana) with one key difference: hemp cannot contain more than 0.3 percent of THC (the compound in the plant most commonly associated with getting a person high). In short, hemp can’t get you high. For decades, federal law did not differentiate hemp from other cannabis plants, all of which were effectively made illegal in 1937 under the Marihuana Tax Act and formally made illegal in 1970 under the Controlled Substances Act—the latter banned cannabis of any kind.

It’s true that hemp policy in the United States has been drastically transformed by this new legislation. However, there remain some misconceptions about what, exactly, this policy change does. Hemp is legal in the United States—with serious restrictions

References:

How To Use CBD On Your Skin (Topical CBD)

What is CBD & Its Benefits? The Ultimate Guide To Cannabidiol

https://www.abcbd.com

https://www.drugabuse.gov